An introduction to the struggles in northern ireland

Here is a posting of his on recent developments there.

An introduction to the struggles in northern ireland

These discussions, however, focus on the issue of trade — the movement of commodities — not on the movement of people. This lack of attention to the realities of the lives of living, breathing, human beings fits with a broader, global, trend towards more authoritarian restrictions on human freedom.

I also draw attention to the human dimensions of restrictions on immigration and immigrants in Ireland, North and South. I argue that immigration and immigrants are going to become even more restricted in the context of Brexit.

I also note the possibilities for resistance to restrictions, and a grassroots movement for human freedom, in existing pro-immigration and pro-immigrant campaigns.

In the discussions about Brexit and the Irish border, there is a lot of talk about the movement of goods across the border. Both the UK government and the EU have expressed a desire to have a frictionless border for goods.

But there is virtually no discussion about the movement of people. When they do so, however, their concerns are the impact that a hard Brexit would have on cross-border trade, the Northern Ireland economy and the fragile peace process. Those who, like Sinn Feinargue in favour of Remaining in the EU, have had little or nothing to say about the treatment of immigrants.

The UK government, which is already struggling to develop a workable exit from the EU, seems to have side-lined the issue of immigration, in order to avoid further complicating matters. The official position appears to be, that the UK has a long-standing arrangement with the Republic of Ireland, regarding the free movement of citizens, between the UK and the Republic.

Some left Brexiteers appear to be reassured by the CTA. This statement is misleading.

An introduction to the struggles in northern ireland

The CTA is not a guarantee of free movement of people. It only covers some people, UK and Irish citizens. It does not cover the citizens of any of the other EU member states, or citizens of states outside the EU.

The Republic of Ireland will remain in the EU. Consequently, EU citizens will retain the right to free movement, in and out of, the jurisdiction of the Irish state, but will not have an automatic right to cross the border into Northern Ireland. Several questions remain unanswered: If there are no passport controls at the border, what will happen in cases where, non-Irish, EU citizens cross the Irish border, i.

Will there be, for example, passport controls for everyone who crosses the Irish Sea by sky or by sea? These questions remain unanswered. Some also take comfort from the opinion polls, which show that hostility towards immigration has softened since the referendum.

The issue of immigration may be out of the headlines, but that does not mean that the position of immigrants in the UK is any better. The issue of immigration has been depoliticised, not resolved. Anyone who believes in a human-centred world, should be unhappy with the way that the topic of immigration has been side-lined, in the discussions about the Irish border.

Immigration controls continue to have an impact on human lives. Every day, thousands of immigrants across the UK suffer the deprivation of their freedom, as they fester in the uncertainty of indefinite detention. We should not collude in the silencing of immigration as a human issue.

Immigration is not something that can be captured in statistics.

Accessibility links This year the programme is fit to burst with important anniversaries; years since the Representation of the People Act gave some women the right to vote. The festival will run from Decemberso in this December to help celebrate.
Brexit: What Is The Irish Border Problem? - LBC Transcription, Editing and Markup:

It is not something to be managed through policy tinkering. It is about real lives.

After an introduction to the parading culture in Northern Ireland, the first part of the article considers the different layers of memory at play in parades. The second part examines the dynamics of spatial memory and particular parading routes of violence, while the third and final part discusses the role of parading memory in transitions as. An Introduction to Murals. The following article explains the use of murals in Northern Ireland. Jarman, Neil. (), 'Painting Landscapes: the place of murals in the symbolic construction of urban space', in, Buckley, Anthony.(ed.) Symbols in Northern Ireland. The present struggle grew out of the oppression and exploitation of Ireland by British imperialism. In particular, it ’grew out’ of the special oppression of the catholic minority in Northern Ireland, and the violence used against them when they .

It is about living, breathing, human beings. This article draws on statistics, and discusses policy. It does so, however, to give some sense of the extent to which immigration controls curtail human freedom in Northern Ireland. The article is divided into six main sections.

The first section provides some background, to explain why Northern Ireland has become a central focus for the Brexit process, and why there is much more at stake than most commentators recognise, or are willing to admit.

Much of the discussion has focused on the issue of cross-border trade. Underlying this focus, however, has been the issue of sovereignty.Background: The internal conflict.

The political and religious conflict in Northern Ireland has had a long history of being passed from generation to generation and is a culture where being part of one group has acquired anger towards member of another.

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After an introduction to the parading culture in Northern Ireland, the first part of the article considers the different layers of memory at play in parades. The second part examines the dynamics of spatial memory and particular parading routes of violence, while the third and final part discusses the role of parading memory in transitions as.

The conflict in Northern Ireland started when it became separated from the rest of Ireland in the early s. Ireland split off from British rule, leaving Northern Ireland as part of the UK and creating a separate country of the Republic of Ireland. 3 days ago · The figures come from the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA).

Thomas, 16, is one of the young people in Northern Ireland who . The Northern Ireland Human Rights Festival is back with a host of great events this December.

From film screenings to dramas, stand-up comedy to kids’ art workshops and book readings, the. The present struggle grew out of the oppression and exploitation of Ireland by British imperialism.

In particular, it ’grew out’ of the special oppression of the catholic minority in Northern Ireland, and the violence used against them when they .

Northern Ireland: A brief background to the conflict