Fragmentation and coherence in eliots the

Eliot's The Waste Land Essay introduction.

Fragmentation and coherence in eliots the

Summary The poet T. Eliot offers us a way of experiencing and interpreting the interplay of our personal and social worlds: For all of us — whether or not we love poetry, and whether or not we see the world through the eyes of Christian faith — Eliot offers us a fruitful and holistic way of thinking about our world Introduction T.

If you happen to be reading this paper while hanging from a strap on the Central or Piccadilly lines, or cheek by jowl on the number 17 bus, then Eliot would have had the same experience about 90 years ago. In many ways, he is the poet of modern life, the prophet of the contemporary city.

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He gives voice to the questions of what it feels like to be an individual in a vast and impersonal culture. Three reasons to engage with Eliot Chances are we encountered Eliot in the show Cats or inflicted on us at school, where — frankly — he did not make much sense.

If we know more of him, it may be in connection with allegations of anti-Semitism, or as a voice of elegiac and nostalgic conservatism speaking loudly over the cacophony of the increasing diversity of cultures that was changing London and the world even when he was writing.

Fragmentation and coherence in eliots the

But why consider an American poet of the last century in a Cambridge Paper? The case is three-fold. First of all, Eliot helps us understand the subterranean in our lives and our culture.

He understood what it feels like to be human and to be caught in cultural currents that seem to be defining our world, whether we agree with them or not. Eliot was a poet of the individual sensibility, but increasingly he came to reach for and to articulate a vision of how humanity works together — how culture and society can be shaped for good or ill by ideas, feelings and beliefs.

He knew how these things could be manufactured and manipulated, how world-views could be constructed through the power of language, through illusions, verbal sleight of hand, a tone of voice. Eliot helps us see how and why irony, suspicion and cynicism can infect the soul and make human community something stultifying to personal and collective flourishing.

Eliot constructs and decodes how your world works, and what it feels like to expose it. And he reaches courageously for antidotes of something strong and true and beautiful and still that makes modern life possible even in the middle of such conditions.

The second reason is that Eliot shows us a pathway to Christian faith for someone of sensibility, rationality and profound scepticism. His formative years saw the First World War.

The first half of his adult life was shaped and defined by his unhappy marriage to Vivien, who suffered mental illness and with whom Eliot found he could not live emotionally. He was a complex man, deeply private, filled with self-doubts. Having grown up in a Unitarian New England family in St.

Louis, Missouri, he made a long and careful journey to a profound Anglo-Catholic Christian faith. His conversion to Christ was a secret affair, involving clandestine meetings in woods with assorted clerics and Christian friends, and a private Confirmation service in the chapel of the Bishop of Oxford, but his convictions were public and forcefully expressed.

Eliot was a public Christian intellectual at a time when society was finding faith less and less credible. He still speaks cogently and with emotional and imaginative sense to our times. And the third reason is that he is quite simply an astoundingly good poet.

He remade poetry for the modern age, and what he does with language and form has rarely if ever been surpassed. To stop and read the top Eliot poems is to experience something extraordinary, that will not admit of the shallow but speaks for a world that is coherent and true and beautiful, even in what Eliot saw as the wreckage of contemporary life.

The Waste Land was published in and propelled Eliot to being considered the premier poet of his day. It is a poem of profound fragmentation and unease, of fear and breakdown.

It is a potent mixture of the everyday, the normal and the simple as well as the abstruse, the alien and the seemingly unconnected. The language is, for the most part, straightforward and even conversational, and so are the images, but the overwhelming sense of fragmentation makes meaning hard to register.

April is the cruellest month, breeding Lilacs out of the dead land, mixing Memory and desire, stirring Dull roots with spring rain.

But at another, the reader is aware that the image of the emerging lilacs is serving duty as an image of something much more. Perhaps most striking of all is the elegiac tone, the emotional sensibility:T.S. Eliot’s Powerful Use of Fragmentation in The Waste Land T.S.

Eliot’s The Waste Land is an elaborate and mysterious montage of lines from other works, fleeting observations, conversations, scenery, and even languages. Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - Author: Sacha van Rood.

Fragmentation and Coherence in The Waste Land T.S. Eliot’s The Waste Land is an intricate poem that is intentionally difficult to understand; it contains a myriad of allusions to other texts, it has a fragmented narrative structure, speaks in various languages and utilizes surreal imagery.

Fragmentation and coherence in eliots the

Moreover, the problem of unified form of Pound‟s Hugh Selwyn Mauberly as well as Eliot‟s The Waste Land, in particular a structural fragmentation, discontinuity and incompleteness could be, however, attributed to the author‟s endeavouring to keep pace with the altering nature of the world or universe on the one hand, and to his attempts to present the remains of the past world, particularly its glorious, .

The Waste Land is an incredibly complex poem, that may appear to lack coherence. Its extensive use of allusions to convey narrative and understanding, its heavily fragmented structure and its various dislocated narratives all give an impression of detachment, frustration and fragmentation.

He remade poetry for the modern age, and what he does with language and form has rarely if ever been surpassed. To stop and read the top Eliot poems is to experience something extraordinary, that will not admit of the shallow but speaks for a world that is coherent and true and beautiful, even in what Eliot saw as the wreckage of contemporary life.

Fragmentation and Coherence in Eliot’s The Waste Land Essay – Free Papers and Essays Examples